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Seven Things — #48 — 17 March 2021

👋 Howdy,

Last week, I took a break. It was a staycation of course and in a way, it was an intensified version of a state that’s been forced upon me for some time now; a state in which I have been bound to look closer and harder in my every-day for what I value in life. Like beauty, entertainment, relaxation, adventure, learning, mystery, creative expression. I’d compare it to looking at a landscape you are trying to sketch, or sitting down in front of a painting at an art gallery and really taking it in: The longer you look, the more details you notice; and the smaller and seemingly insignificant one such detail appears, the more joy you take from discovering it.

If you’ve seen my Instagram feed, you’ll have noticed that I’ve been on a quest to notice mundane beauty in my immediate neighbourhood. The pictures are inherently ordinary, but they’ve given me joy. For under usual circumstances I might not have thought of these scenes as worth looking at twice.

In my week off, I’ve sketched comics during an online drawing class, interchangeably used my living room as a yoga studio, craft workshop, wellness spa, and cinema. I got my hands dirty prepping the communal garden for a (hopefully more fruitful) second season. Instead of travel literature, I read stories about the nearby swimming pond. The crowning adventure was a road trip to a cold and muddy beach right by a nuclear power station (see below).

It wasn’t a glamorous trip on a plane to some exotic destination, but as it turns out, there is much to be gained from engaging more deeply with the ordinary.

Here are Seven Things I’ve been curious about lately:

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💌 Thank you for being curious with me.


Disclaimer: Any opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of any current or previous employers.

Some things don't need innovating

Seven Things — #47 — 26 February 2021

Howdy 👋,

Square February brought about a minor dispute in my household. In a month that precisely mapped to four weeks in the calendar, I came across the concept and history of the 13-Month calendar, in which every month of the year did the same (see below).

On a walk through a park near my home, I explained the merits of such regularity in timekeeping to my partner. I described the randomness of our current system in which certain months have certain lengths just because some Roman emporer needed the longest one to be named after themselves.

My partner couldn’t disagree more. “I like calendars being messy.”, she explained. “The quirks in our current one represent so much of our history. And history is messy.”

In the end, I had to concede. “I guess you're right. Though I really enjoy it when someone questions something everyone else takes as a given and tries to improve it. I think that's really admirable.”

“Yes,” she said. “That we can agree on.”

It seems some things don’t need improving. At least not for now.

Here are Seven Things I was curious about lately:

🤝 Please forward this newsletter to a friend. 💪 It’ll help me keep going.

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💌 Thank you for being curious with me.


Disclaimer: Any opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of any current or previous employers.

😜 It doesn't have to be crazy at work 🏢

Seven Things — #46 — 18 February 2021

👋 Howdy and welcome to the museum of curiosities that is this newsletter.

There are certain stereotypes about the different kinds of companies out there. There’s the small and nimble startup bursting with energy, innovation, agility, where colleagues are ‘in the trenches’ and work as if there’s no tomorrow, bending the rules when necessary to change the world. On the other end of the scale, you get the corporate behemoth with all its power and influence, a huge staff representing cogs in a machine designed to grow shareholder value. In between, you’d find agencies and consultancies, tech companies, SMEs and more, each with their own stereotypes attached to them.

Throughout my career, I made it my goal to spend some time with each of these types to learn from them, sometimes transferring what worked in one context to another. In doing so, it occurred to me that these stereotypes are just that, and I’ve come across companies and people that did things differently with ‘radical’ thoughts such as these: Maybe entrepreneurs don’t have to be fresh-faced PhD dropouts working 100 hour weeks out of a garage each day of the week. Maybe large corporates don’t inherently demand legal and regulatory teams stifling every attempt of innovating.

The past year has undoubtedly shaken up our ideas of what it means to work or run a company. Looking beyond the question of whether to work remotely or from an office down the line, there are more ‘radical ideas’ to explore opportunities in shaking up existing stereotypes and default operating models. These were the things I was especially curious about lately:

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💌 Thank you for being curious with me.


Disclaimer: Any opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of any current or previous employers.

🤔 Only the Curious Will Be Amazed 🌈

Seven Things — #45 — 4 February 2021

👋 Howdy!

Following the tech news is always entertaining, yet usually, of little consequence to most. Between each stage, from the initial reporting on a new technology, to it being talked about in growing communities, to finally reaching a level where one might interact with it as part of their every-day, there tends to be a drawn-out and rigorous filtering process.

Then, every so often, I’ll experience a version of such a novelty in a way which makes me believe that its spread and application on a larger, societal scale is relatively imminent.

They’re quite hard to not dismiss too early, these moments of wonder, as you could be forgiven to think, oh, here’s another underwhelming rendition of a chatbot, or, this VR experience is cool, but it still requires far too much computing power to be feasibly used by consumers. Sometimes, it is worth actually making an effort to remain curious.

Here are the Seven Things I was curious about lately.

🤝 Please forward this newsletter to a friend. 💪 It’ll help me keep going.

✍️ If you haven’t yet, subscribe here.

💌 Thank you for being curious with me.


Disclaimer: Any opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of any current or previous employers.

Why the logo should not be bigger

Seven Things — #44 — 18 January 2021

👋 Howdy!

Have you found your stride in the New Year yet? January is always a time of reflection, renewal, and new beginnings; maybe even some hope. It’s also the time where I relearn the very practical but essential skills needed to make my workday possible - like taking a chisel to my calendar and carving out focus time wherever I see a possible opening.

As the year trundles on, the stream of last-year/new-year content on the internet slowly subsides. Still, as I was waiting in the cold outside our vet’s no-humans-allowed practice yesterday, regularly switching hands to stop my freezing fingers from falling off, I found some more items that very much felt befitting to this category. They’re part of the Seven Things I was curious about lately:

🤝 Please forward this newsletter to a friend. 💪 It’ll help me keep going.

✍️ If you haven’t yet, subscribe here.

💌 Thank you for being curious with me.


Disclaimer: Any opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of any current or previous employers.

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